Faculty Grants to support teaching and learning are now open.  Consider applying today!  

 LEVEL UP! Augmented Reality Faculty Game Camp is scheduled for May 12-13, 2014.  

 

Digital Scholars Institute Pilot Project Begins!

Innovative Digital Pedagogy Fellowship Award Applications Due March 27, 2014.

Innovative Digital Pedagogy Fellowship Awards Winners! Dr. Elizabeth Lewis (College of Arts and Sciences, Modern and Foreign Languages), Dr. Andrea Livi Smith (College of Arts and Sciences, Historic Preservation)! Dr. Janine Davis (College of Education, Curriculum & Instruction), Dr. Mark Snyder(College of Arts and Sciences, Music Department) and Dr. Susan Fernsebner (College of Arts and Sciences, History and American Studies) received an honorarium.

Dr. Miriam Liss, Psychology Professor in the College of Arts and Sciences has been awarded a Box of Awesome for her December submission. If you see Miriam be sure to congratulate her and ask her what was in her ‘Box of Awesome.’

Apply for a professional grant to attend the Lilly Conference on College & University Teaching. May 29 – June 1, 2014 at Bethesda, Maryland.

Domain of One’s Own: UMW Faculty-centered Initiative Call for Participation is now closed. 18 faculty from the College of Arts and Sciences, College of Business, and College of Education have joined the Spring 2014 University-wide Initiative.

Learn about and discuss emergent topics, important questions, scholarly work, and teaching and learning pedagogy.

 

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Teaching Professor Conference (May 30-June 1, 2014, Boston). Apply for a Professional Grant and Attend!

January Box of Awesome Winner!

 

IMG_3595Dr. Miriam Liss, Psychology Professor in the College of Arts and Sciences has been awarded a Box of Awesome for her December submission. If you see Miriam be sure to congratulate her and ask her what was in her ‘Box of Awesome.’

Miriam designed a review activity that is “fun, engaging, reinforces relevant concepts, and allows students to direct learning and review. Furthermore, this activity requires little advanced preparation on my part so is easy to integrate into a busy teaching load. This is a Jeopardy review game with a twist – the students write the review questions. The day before the review each student is assigned a topic that will be covered in the exam. The students then bring in two index cards with a points value on one side (100,200,300,400 and 500) and a jeopardy style answer and question on the other side. I come to class with tape and a dry erase marker to write the categories on the board.

Liss-as-Alex-TrabeckThen I get ready to be Alex Trabeck -students call me Alex and in this picture one of my students created a mustache for me to wear during the game! Students tape their questions on the board under their category and then form team of rows and give themselves a team name that is usually relevant to the course material (e.g. the Superegos, or Karen Horney’s heros). Students are picked row by row to pick a category and give the right “question” for the jeopardy answer. The game is open book, open note and open conversation – anyone in the row can help. If the team gets the question wrong or times out (they cannot answer in the time it takes me to sing the Jeopardy theme song), the question gets passed to the next row. Score is kept but winners only get bragging rights. Occasionally I ask a spontaneous 100 point bonus question to ensure everything gets reviewed. For those questions I ask something that I think needs to be reviewed and anyone can shout out an answer. If anyone on the team gets it right the team gets 100 points. Sometimes at the end I give 100 points for pointing out major topics in a category that was not reviewed.

Jeopardy review reinforces the material, creates a fun class atmosphere and encourages students to think about what material should be reviewed ahead of time when they make their index card questions.

 

Digital Scholars Institute

CTE&I begins the work of developing the Digital Scholars Institute.  This institute will provide support for 10 faculty engaged in digital scholarship.

October ‘Box of Awesome’ Winner Announced

Dave-Henderson-Box-of-Awesome-TropicalDr. Dave Henderson, Professor in the College of Business has been awarded a Box of Awesome for his October submission. If you see Dave be sure to congratulate him and ask him what was in his ‘Box of Awesome.’

Dave shared, “I strongly believe that students need to recognize the connection between business and the liberal arts. To this end, I have created two group presentations that connect different liberal arts disciplines to Accounting.” Below are two of his projects:

1) “History and Expense Reports,” requires students to read the book “George Washington’s Expense Account.” The intent of this assignment is to help students understand how historical events, such as the Revolutionary War, can be interpreted by examining accounting records.

2)  “Psychology and Relevant Costing,” asks students to read psychology research about why people consider sunk costs when making decisions. The intent of this assignment is two-fold: first, to help students recognize that even executive managers are often influenced by psychological biases when making important business decisions; and second, to help students realize the relevance of psychology theories (e.g., prospect theory) to business judgment and decision-making.

‘Box of Awesome’ Winner Announced

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Dr. Jon Pineda, Professor in the English, Linguistics, and Communication Department has been awarded a Box of Awesome for his September submission.     If you seen Jon be sure to congratulate him and ask him what was in his ‘Box of Awesome.’

How often do you get to watch cartoons FOR class? Well, that’s what we’re doing in ENGL 302a: Intro to Creative Writing. To help my students better understand character Point of View (POV) and utilize concrete and significant details in their own writing, I’ve provided them with four video clips from “Adventure Time” and “Regular Show” (both Cartoon Network shows) and have asked that they choose a character from one of the clips and write a “story fragment” from that character’s perspective. They’re not simply summarizing the scenes; they’re establishing (and writing from) that particular character’s consciousness.

The clips are available under the “Assignments” page of the course blog (http://302prose.umwblogs.org/assignments/), and my students have already started posting their “story fragments” on the blog’s Home page. It’s been fun watching them engage with this assignment! Plus, it’s taken the burden off of them to write fully developed short stories…we’ll get to that part later in the semester.