FSEM Courses

Welcome! Here you'll find a full list of all Fall 2017 First-Year Seminar (FSEM) offerings. Browse through the pages of classes, select a course from the first dropdown menu, or browse by subject area. Please note that this site shows the FSEMs regardless of whether or not they are full, so there is no guarantee that a course will still be open at the time of your registration.

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    FSEM 100G4 | Race & Revolution
    jamesfarmer

    A section of this FSEM is designated as an honors course and satisfies the requirements for students enrolled in the University Honors Program. In this course, we will explore the life and work of James Farmer, an exemplary leader of the U.S. Civil Rights Movement who taught at Mary Washington during the 1990s, the historical background to the black freedom revolution, and its ongoing relevance to our contemporary dialogues, interactions, and policies about race in the U.S. We will investigate the history of the concept of race and its impact on how we perceive ourselves and the world.

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    FSEM 100J9 | History of Genocides
    Barbed wire

    This section of FSEM is designated as an honors course and satisfies the requirements for students enrolled in the University Honors Program. This FSEM is an exploration of the modern history of human rights, humanitarianism, and war crimes, conducted through the examination of several cases of mass violence, some of which have come to be labeled “genocide.”

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    FSEM 100M6 | The Grail Legend
    grail

    This section of FSEM is designated as an honors course and satisfies the requirements for students enrolled in the University Honors Program. The origins of the Grail Legend are buried too deeply in our mythographic history to be clearly established. Students will examine how the Grail Legend takes on a life of its own in the literary history of Europe, and they will develop an independent project that reflects solid methodology appropriate to their topic.

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    FSEM 100N5 | Economic Inequality: End of the American Dream?
    americandream

    This section of FSEM is designated as an honors course and satisfies the requirements for students enrolled in the University Honors Program. The United States has long been thought of as a classless society—or more precisely, one in which nearly everyone is middle class. The average wage rate, adjusted for inflation, has remained stagnant, and the majority of income gains in the U.S. have gone to those already with the highest incomes. What has caused these trends? Most importantly, what, if anything, can and should be done about them?

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    FSEM 100N6 | Part Game, Part Play: Gamers and Gaming
    partgame

    This section of FSEM is designated as an honors course and satisfies the requirements for students enrolled in the University Honors Program. Games have played a role in every generation and are part of mainstream culture. Games foster engagement—the foundation of any positive learning experience. In this course, you will become game designers and create a game around a serious topic of choice. An exploratory and participatory approach is central to this course experience.

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    FSEM 100P6 | Science and Technology—Because We Can, Should We?
    Hela Cells

    This section of FSEM is designated as an honors course and satisfies the requirements for students enrolled in the University Honors Program. Is science going too far? Is it pushing the boundaries of what should be done by what can be done? This FSEM will examine some of the greatest scientific advances in the last 50 years, the impacts they had on society, and the cost of these advancements.

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    HIST 201 | First-Year Seminar in European History: The Early Crusades
    crusades

    This section of FSEM is designated as an honors course and satisfies the requirements for students enrolled in the University Honors Program. What were the Crusades? Were they the first stirrings of European colonialism, medieval style? Were they the heroic attempts to rescue Jerusalem from the Infidel (whether the infidels were Christian or Muslim)? In this seminar, you will have the chance to answer these questions by reading the words of participants and witnesses to these brutal, cataclysmic, and apocalyptic wars for control of sites holy to three religions.

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